Press

Keith Bruce – The Herald 22nd October 2017

BambinO First and foremost it unequivocally succeeds in the unlikely chief aim of bringing opera to infants[…] All four onstage are excellent,[…] but Hoather, in particular, is exceptional, singing beautifully and engaging with her audience every moment of the performance and beyond. She picks her way carefully between the rug-rats, eyeballing individuals with a vocabulary of expressions as eloquent as her sonic range, which takes in chirping and purring as naturally as coloratura.

Kirstin Innes – The Edinburgh Festival List 10th August 2017

From the moment soprano Charlotte Hoather, playing mama bird Uccellina, opens her mouth, the audience is rapt and silent […]The exaggerated, performative facial expressions are hugely appealing to babies – Hoather’s gorgeous, animated eyes earn lots of gummy smiles as she roams the room

Fiona Maddocks – The Guardian 14th July 2017

Uccellina (the outstanding, bewitching young soprano Charlotte Hoather) finds a golden egg, which grows and hatches […] Flowing arpeggios and snatches of melody at times echo baroque opera but BambinO has its own, mercurial character […]Rarely has innocent pleasure felt so vital. BravO Scottish Opera.

Sam Jackson – The Times 11th July 2017

The singers weave between the audience, involving the children in the performance in an inventive yet entirely natural way[…] it was genuinely moving to see a little girl of no more than nine months giggling with delight as the soprano, Charlotte Hoather, imitated bird sounds during a playful, beautiful aria. Another benefit of BambinO was that it put paid to that rather tired accusation against opera: namely, that it is inaccessible or elitist.’

Mary Brennan – The Herald 19th April 2015

Scottish Opera’s Connect company […] The opening piece, Jonathan Dove’s The Walk in the Garden, thrummed with a somber intensity that demanded much, of the soloists especially. Inspired by Milton’s Paradise Lost, Dove uses the expulsion of Adam (Glen Cunningham) and Eve (Charlotte Hoather) from Eden into an earthly wasteland to echo our own self-inflicted loss of natural habitat through climate change.

The chorus, who bookend the piece in thundering volume (as God, then Milton) sit on-stage as Adam and Eve, garbed like jet-setting holiday-makers, scale Dove’s heights of remembered joys, despair and resignation.

A fierce, compelling work to which young voices gave a touching truth.

Derbyshire Life – Geoff Ford 4th February 2014

For Tideswell Male Voice Choir’s annual visit to Buxton Opera House, The Military Wives Choir returned as special guests for another sell-out performance[…]The choir’s annual visit to Buxton is an opportunity to showcase some of the brightest young talent around […]Charlotte Hoather sang with the choir for the first time […]The young soloists were sublime and received a standing ovation at the end of another marvellous evening.

Buxton Advertiser – Gay Bolton 8th October 2013

Tideswell’s principal conductor and musical director Dennis Kay has a reputation for encouraging young singers and at this concert, spectators saw some of the best take centre stage. Charlotte Hoather, a vocal music student of the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, gave a dazzling performance of Time To Say Goodbye, sung in Italian and English, before an equally powerful and moving rendition of O Mio Babbino Caro […] Top solos came from Charlotte Hoathe who gave an emotionally-charged performance as Eponine, singing On My Own and A Little Fall Of Rain